Children's Injury

If a child is killed or injured, parents are entitled to bring a lawsuit on behalf of the minor for damages suffered by the minor and to recovers their costs, such as medical or funeral expenses, from the person responsible. Remember, generally, no one under the age of 18 can file a lawsuit without the help of a parent, adult, or guardian.

In December of 2016, the National Institute of Child Health and development listed the most common causes of pediatric injury, which are:

Motor vehicle accidents

In children ages 5 to 19, injuries from motor vehicle accidents are the top cause of death from injury. Every hour, almost 150 children visit emergency departments due to serious injuries from motor vehicle accidents.

Suffocation (being unable to breathe)

Infants are most likely to suffocate while they sleep. Toddlers are most at risk from suffocating by choking on food or other small objects. If you have an infant in daycare be sure that they follow safe sleeping practices in order to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). To protect your toddler from choking hazards, be sure that their day care center keeps play areas free from small toys which could become a choking hazard.

Drowning

Drowning is the most common cause of death from injury in children ages 1 to 4. Three children die every day from drowning. Although not common, one disturbing cause of death and serious injury to young swimmers is known as circulation entrapment. Circulation entrapment occurs when the child is trapped by the suction generated by the drain of a pool, hot tub or spa.

Poisoning

Two children die every day from poisoning. Hundreds of children ages 0 to 19 in the United States go to emergency departments daily because of poisoning. Common causes of poisoning include household chemicals, cleaners, and medicines.

Burns

Two children die every day from being burned. Each day, more than 300 children arrive in emergency departments to be treated for burns. Younger children are more likely to be burned by hot liquids or steam. These types of injuries can result from faulty equipment in laundry mats and spills occurring in restaurants. Older children are more likely to be burned from direct contact with fire. Backyard fire pits, out of control campground fires and the lack of smoke detectors in rental properties are often a cause of these injuries.

Falls

Falls are the most common cause of nonfatal injuries for children ages 0 to 19. Each day, about 8,000 children visit emergency departments due to injuries from falls. One source of danger to children is unsafe playground equipment and playgrounds that fail to have appropriate shock-absorbent landing surfaces.

Determining liability for your child's injury is often a complicated matter. If you are a parent, guardian, or concerned adult related to a minor who has been seriously injured, you should speak with an experienced lawyer who has handled injury claims on behalf of minors. The lawyers at Holman & Stefanowicz, LLC have handled many cases on behalf of injured children and their families. To ensure that your child receives just compensation for current and future expenses related to their injury, contact Holman & Stefanowicz, LLC at 312-258-9700 to discuss your potential case with an attorney at our firm.

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