Sexual Harassment

The most common type of harassment is sexual harassment.

Sexual harassment has been defined by the courts as "unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitutes sexual harassment when submission to or rejection of this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual's employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual's work performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment."

Another theory of sexual harassment is quid pro quo harassment. Quid pro quo harassment occurs in the workplace when a manager or other authority figure offers or merely hints that he or she will give the employee something (e.g., a promotion) in return for that employee's satisfaction of a sexual demand. Quid pro quo harassment also occurs when a manager or other authority figure says he or she will not fire or reprimand an employee in exchange for some type of sexual favor. A job applicant also may be the subject of this kind of harassment if the hiring decision was based on the acceptance or rejection of sexual advances.

If you believe that your employer has violated the law, call Holman & Stefanowicz, LLC at 312-258-9700 for a free evaluation of your potential claim. We can help determine whether you have a claim.

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